Part of the reason we’re seeing so many black men killed is that police officers are now best understood less as members of communities, dedicated to keeping peace within them, than as domestic soldiers. The drug war has long functioned as a full-employment act for arms dealers looking to sell every town and village in the country on the need for military-grade hardware, and 9/11 made things vastly worse, with local police departments throughout America grabbing for cash to better defend against any and all terrorist threats. War had reached our shores, we were told, and police officers needed weaponry to fight it.

Officers have tanks now. They have drones. They have automatic rifles, and planes, and helicopters, and they go through military-style boot camp training. It’s a constant complaint from what remains of this country’s civil liberties caucus. Just this last June, the ACLU issued a report on how police departments now possess arsenals in need of a use. Few paid attention, as usually happens.

The worst part of outfitting our police officers as soldiers has been psychological. Give a man access to drones, tanks, and body armor, and he’ll reasonably think that his job isn’t simply to maintain peace, but to eradicate danger. Instead of protecting and serving, police are searching and destroying.

If officers are soldiers, it follows that the neighborhoods they patrol are battlefields. And if they’re working battlefields, it follows that the population is the enemy. And because of correlations, rooted in historical injustice, between crime and income and income and race, the enemy population will consist largely of people of color, and especially of black men. Throughout the country, police officers are capturing, imprisoning, and killing black males at a ridiculous clip, waging a very literal war on people like Michael Brown.

Greg Howard, "America Is Not for Black People"

race racism blackness police aclu police militarization civil liberties politics culture drug war criminal justice michael brown ferguson

The United States of America is not for black people. We know this, and then we put it out of our minds, and then something happens to remind us.

Greg Howard, "America Is Not for Black People"

1 note race politics blackness racism culture ferguson michael brown

The worst day as a sports fan is the day after the Super Bowl. This is not because football is over; it’s because because you have to live with what you’ve done. The only saving grace, you think, is that the NFL would have done it anyway, whether or not you watched. And that’s how it wins. That is how it will win. It’s how it has already won.

Bryan Joiner, "How the NFL Wins"

longreads sports culture football nfl ethics philosophy

The Power of the Punch | The Classical

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Lorne Again

tv culture snl lorne michaels comedy longreads

cahun-caha:

Remember that epic Joan Didion hatchet job of Manhattan? Why did no one mention that she also had the best response to mansplaining ever?


I have no idea what the context of this is, and Didion’s response is hilarious, but I’m not sure how the letter is mansplaining. Unless that was a joke, in which case I’m the asshole

cahun-caha:

Remember that epic Joan Didion hatchet job of Manhattan? Why did no one mention that she also had the best response to mansplaining ever?


I have no idea what the context of this is, and Didion’s response is hilarious, but I’m not sure how the letter is mansplaining. Unless that was a joke, in which case I’m the asshole

cahun-caha:

Remember that epic Joan Didion hatchet job of Manhattan? Why did no one mention that she also had the best response to mansplaining ever?


I have no idea what the context of this is, and Didion’s response is hilarious, but I’m not sure how the letter is mansplaining. Unless that was a joke, in which case I’m the asshole

cahun-caha:

Remember that epic Joan Didion hatchet job of Manhattan? Why did no one mention that she also had the best response to mansplaining ever?

I have no idea what the context of this is, and Didion’s response is hilarious, but I’m not sure how the letter is mansplaining. Unless that was a joke, in which case I’m the asshole

(via aintgotnoladytronblues)

68 notes

flavorpill:

Gavin McInnes getting fired from Thought Catalog has nothing to do with a violation of the First Amendment, if you really want to get angry about a violation of free speech, look no further than Ferguson.

Word

flavorpill:

Gavin McInnes getting fired from Thought Catalog has nothing to do with a violation of the First Amendment, if you really want to get angry about a violation of free speech, look no further than Ferguson.

Word

23 notes free speech culture politics thought catalog

Non-theatrical sequels are still a brand-first, story-second game. 1440 Entertainment selects projects based on their potential to hit big. Why make a sequel to a movie like Jarhead? It’s still playing big where it matters. The numbers make sense. The EVP’s team looks at DVD rentals, iTunes downloads, streaming numbers, TV distribution, and international markets. When asked of his intel-gathering methods, Ross is transparent: “I got Google.” Online chatter is a vital metric, too. Ross could produce a wartime movie that doesn’t infringe on the legacy of Jarhead, but slapping it with a stagnant IP gives it automatic legs. “It does some marketing for you. You come to it with a built-in consumer. You go on Facebook and people are constantly having dialogue about it,” Ross says.

[…]

“I can’t tell you how many times we’ve come up with a film and people look at us and go ‘What? If you can’t have XYZ actor, he was really what the movie was all about.’ We’ve proven that as long as you maintain the integrity of the brand, you have flexibility.”

Matt Patches, "Hollywood’s Secret-Sequel Economy"

film industry hollywood direct-to-video movies jarhead 2 sequels economics capitalism brands big data algorithm

Fast & Furious & Elegant: Justin Lin and the Vulgar Auteurs

film aesthetics philosophy vulgar auteurism

Rihanna, Katy Perry, or Coldplay might be doing the Super Bowl halftime show this year—that is, if they’re willing to pay up. According to The Wall Street Journal, the NFL has narrowed down its list of potential performers for the 2015 gig to those three candidates, though it’s also asking “at least some of the acts” if they’d be willing to pay the league for the privilege of playing the halftime show—something that’s absolutely insane, but not 100 percent unreasonable, considering how many people actually watch the performance. Alternately (and this is where it gets wacky), they should “be willing to contribute a portion of their post-Super Bowl tour income to the league.”

While the Super Bowl halftime show is obviously a choice gig, the idea that the NFL thinks it should then be owed part of Katy Perry’s tour revenue is laughable.

AV Club

This is the canary in the coal mine, people

(Source: The A.V. Club)

music industry pop culture