Memes and Misogynoir

culture politics race blackness racism misogynoir internet memes

During slavery, it was commonly propounded that the whites were both smarter and stronger than blacks. There were even faux concerns that if slavery were abolished, the black race would die out, unable to survive on its own. Once slavery ended, however, things changed. The ‘happy docile slave stereotype’ (there were always multiple variants) was replaced by the predator/rapist, whose purported presence served to justify wave upon wave of lynching epidemics.

What these examples show is how fluid racist ideologies can be under pressure, and yet still fulfill their same basic function of justifying and naturalizing racially stratified outcomes. The book ‘Social Dominance: An Intergroup Theory of Social Hierarchy and Oppression’ explains how stratified societies maintain themselves with a mixture of hierarchy-enhancing and hierarchy-attenuating ideas, values and ‘legitimating myths,’ which can vary over time, but still continued to produce stratified outcomes provided newer legitimating myths emerge to support hierarchy, as the older ones fall out of favor.

In America as a whole, perhaps the most useful framework for understanding this process in the so-called post-civil rights era is Eduardo Bonilla-Silva’s concept of ‘colorblind racism,’ as explained in his 2003 book, ‘Racism Without Racists: Color-Blind Racism and the Persistence of Racial Inequality in the United States.’ While the idea of a ‘colorblind’ social order was, in the 19th century, a relatively radical, emancipatory idea, more recently the notion has been turned upside down, with the claim that we are already colorblind, except, perhaps, for those who still see racial injustices. The concept of ‘colorblind racism’ neatly captures what’s involved in this shell game.

'The central component of any dominant racial ideology is its frames or set paths for interpreting information,' Bonilla-Silva explained, and he identified four such frames at the heart of colorblind racism: 1) Abstract Liberalism, using ideas associated with political liberalism (such as 'equal opportunity,' the idea that force should not be used to achieve social policy) and economic liberalism (choice, individualism) — in an abstract manner to explain racial matters. 2) Naturalization ('That’s just how things are.') 3) Cultural Racism (arguments like 'Mexicans don’t put much emphasis on education' or 'Blacks have too many babies'to explain the condition of minorities.) 4) Minimization of Racism, which simultaneously acknowledges and dismisses persistent racism ('It’s better now than in the past' or 'There is discrimination, but there are plenty of jobs out there').

With this framework as background, it’s not hard to understand the evolution of even more pernicious extremist variants in the right-wing media, which Boehlert sketched out. It began with Andrew Breitbart and his website announcing that ‘basically racism had been eradicated, and that anyone who talked about the topic was therefore a racist,’ especially ‘civil rights activists and civil libertarians … because by raising questions, or talking about it, or discussing it, they were trying to rip the country apart, because the country is already solved racism.’

Paul Rosenberg, Fox News is tearing us apart: Race baiting and divisiveness hits disgusting new low (via jamesmdavisson)

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The It Factor

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Mind Games

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Is This Thing On? The Eight Most Essential Inessential ‘SNL’ Musical Guests

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bloomcity:

do you ever go down that dark path of like — haha but surely i cannot write about my OPINIONS. i got them just by living and thinking!

Every day. It seems like cheating.

15 notes writing

The Problem of the Black Cast Member on ‘SNL’

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This Is Harry Shearer: The Former ‘SNL’ Cast Member’s Remarkable Nose for (the Voices of the) News

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hardcorefornerds:

thewoodquarter:

benicetoafriend:

drinkingfromtherubicon:

cristoecafe:

eurofox:

benicetoafriend:

eurofox:

benicetoafriend:

IRA - Irish Republican Army
normally when i see europeans with guns i get worried that they’re probably fascist. when they’re irish though, i know its gonna be alright.

They murdered a lot of innocent people though. Even people they claimed to represent.

the same slurs used against every revolutionary/national liberation movement from the bolsheviks to every organization in palestine who has taken up armed struggle. 
how about instead of blaming the IRA for the deaths of innocent irish, maybe you place the blame on the soldiers marching under the union jack.

Because they caused the deaths of innocent people, as did the Britsh. But it was the IRA who took my mums cousin out and shot him in front of his co-workers when he was only 18 because he said he wanted nothing to do with them once he realised what sort of people they were. He was an Irish catholic. They also harassed a lad in my mums youth group, making threats towards his family until he couldn’t take it and killed himself. He was an Irish catholic too.
There was plenty of scumbags on both sides. It’s not a slur when it’s true.

^ 

ethnic nationalists are repulsive.

right, says the white settler on indigenous land. weigh in later when you’ve been enslaved and humiliated for 800+ years.

L OH FUCKING L
There is nothing more hilarious than tumblr ~*rAdIcAlS*~ speaking over lived experiences of violence to promote solidarity. 
Irish people criticising the IRA?'No, shut up you dont understand the conflict you're living through.'
Feck off. 

I don’t really have any direct lived experience of the Troubles, as growing up in south county Dublin is probably as far away from it as you could get in Ireland. But there’s one thing that always sticks in my mind as a ’90s kid’ was that, alongside the gnomes in the attic, what I was afraid of in the night on hearing a van pull up outside was that it was the IRA coming to kidnap my family (it was actually the milkman in the early morning, I think). We were Protestant, but apart from that there was no absolutely no logic behind the fear, which wasn’t all that great, considering - I didn’t lose much sleep over it, in comparison to other things, and I can only imagine what real childhood trauma from conflict must be like. Still, it’s unsettling that it was such a part of the surrounding culture that I picked up at such a young age. You could say that it was due to media demonisation, or you could say it was unavoidable. In any case, I’m of a generation who saw the last atrocities of the Troubles on the nightly news as children.
The recent death of Albert Reynolds is the passing of, I think, the first Taoiseach I can recall. And I remember the 1998 Good Friday Agreement much better than anything about the Downing Street Declaration, but I was aware of IRA ceasefires and the frustratingly slow progress of the peace process. There was a very moving scene recorded on TV at Reynold’s funeral yesterday where the celebrant addressed his British counterpart, John Major, in the church, telling him he was ‘most welcome’, followed by a spontaneous ripple of applause, and then a shot of Major wiping away a tear. Whatever you may think of either of their day-to-day politics, or of the current outcome of the peace process and its interminable but non-violent political wrangling, they achieved something of immeasurable importance. You can debate the history and the role of violence as much as you want, but the vast majority of people here are just glad it’s over. 
A more political viewpoint I, and I know many others, share is a strong opposition to the nationalist repulican ideology that justified so much violence and suffering, irrespective of the wrongs (of which there were many and greater) on the other side. I don’t know, were I there, if I would always have been opposed to physical-force republicanism, or what year would be the dividing line between radically naive and irresponsibly futile - it’s a counterfactual I don’t have to answer. But I do know an awareness of as many sides as possible of the history is important - because it is the lens through which every Irish person ought to see world affairs. Our support for the Palestinian cause is usually attributed to the Irish struggle for national liberation - although for me what I also see is an uncomfortable ambivalence towards anti-Semitism in Irish history, and more importantly a parallel between the partition of this island and the need for some kind of reconciliation or mutual understanding between divided communities. Ferguson, too, has circular echoes of the civil rights movement in late 60s Northern Ireland, inspired by its African-American counterpart, but which, for various complex reasons, derailed into thirty years of violence. It’s the legacy of the North, in large part, which makes me so uncomfortable about constant demands to ‘take a side’, to buy into the oppressed/oppressor binary which, even if it expresses some deep and uncomfortable truths about our world, does not necessarily present the solution.

Nuance- it’s what to do!

hardcorefornerds:

thewoodquarter:

benicetoafriend:

drinkingfromtherubicon:

cristoecafe:

eurofox:

benicetoafriend:

eurofox:

benicetoafriend:

IRA - Irish Republican Army
normally when i see europeans with guns i get worried that they’re probably fascist. when they’re irish though, i know its gonna be alright.

They murdered a lot of innocent people though. Even people they claimed to represent.

the same slurs used against every revolutionary/national liberation movement from the bolsheviks to every organization in palestine who has taken up armed struggle. 
how about instead of blaming the IRA for the deaths of innocent irish, maybe you place the blame on the soldiers marching under the union jack.

Because they caused the deaths of innocent people, as did the Britsh. But it was the IRA who took my mums cousin out and shot him in front of his co-workers when he was only 18 because he said he wanted nothing to do with them once he realised what sort of people they were. He was an Irish catholic. They also harassed a lad in my mums youth group, making threats towards his family until he couldn’t take it and killed himself. He was an Irish catholic too.
There was plenty of scumbags on both sides. It’s not a slur when it’s true.

^ 

ethnic nationalists are repulsive.

right, says the white settler on indigenous land. weigh in later when you’ve been enslaved and humiliated for 800+ years.

L OH FUCKING L
There is nothing more hilarious than tumblr ~*rAdIcAlS*~ speaking over lived experiences of violence to promote solidarity. 
Irish people criticising the IRA?'No, shut up you dont understand the conflict you're living through.'
Feck off. 

I don’t really have any direct lived experience of the Troubles, as growing up in south county Dublin is probably as far away from it as you could get in Ireland. But there’s one thing that always sticks in my mind as a ’90s kid’ was that, alongside the gnomes in the attic, what I was afraid of in the night on hearing a van pull up outside was that it was the IRA coming to kidnap my family (it was actually the milkman in the early morning, I think). We were Protestant, but apart from that there was no absolutely no logic behind the fear, which wasn’t all that great, considering - I didn’t lose much sleep over it, in comparison to other things, and I can only imagine what real childhood trauma from conflict must be like. Still, it’s unsettling that it was such a part of the surrounding culture that I picked up at such a young age. You could say that it was due to media demonisation, or you could say it was unavoidable. In any case, I’m of a generation who saw the last atrocities of the Troubles on the nightly news as children.
The recent death of Albert Reynolds is the passing of, I think, the first Taoiseach I can recall. And I remember the 1998 Good Friday Agreement much better than anything about the Downing Street Declaration, but I was aware of IRA ceasefires and the frustratingly slow progress of the peace process. There was a very moving scene recorded on TV at Reynold’s funeral yesterday where the celebrant addressed his British counterpart, John Major, in the church, telling him he was ‘most welcome’, followed by a spontaneous ripple of applause, and then a shot of Major wiping away a tear. Whatever you may think of either of their day-to-day politics, or of the current outcome of the peace process and its interminable but non-violent political wrangling, they achieved something of immeasurable importance. You can debate the history and the role of violence as much as you want, but the vast majority of people here are just glad it’s over. 
A more political viewpoint I, and I know many others, share is a strong opposition to the nationalist repulican ideology that justified so much violence and suffering, irrespective of the wrongs (of which there were many and greater) on the other side. I don’t know, were I there, if I would always have been opposed to physical-force republicanism, or what year would be the dividing line between radically naive and irresponsibly futile - it’s a counterfactual I don’t have to answer. But I do know an awareness of as many sides as possible of the history is important - because it is the lens through which every Irish person ought to see world affairs. Our support for the Palestinian cause is usually attributed to the Irish struggle for national liberation - although for me what I also see is an uncomfortable ambivalence towards anti-Semitism in Irish history, and more importantly a parallel between the partition of this island and the need for some kind of reconciliation or mutual understanding between divided communities. Ferguson, too, has circular echoes of the civil rights movement in late 60s Northern Ireland, inspired by its African-American counterpart, but which, for various complex reasons, derailed into thirty years of violence. It’s the legacy of the North, in large part, which makes me so uncomfortable about constant demands to ‘take a side’, to buy into the oppressed/oppressor binary which, even if it expresses some deep and uncomfortable truths about our world, does not necessarily present the solution.

Nuance- it’s what to do!

hardcorefornerds:

thewoodquarter:

benicetoafriend:

drinkingfromtherubicon:

cristoecafe:

eurofox:

benicetoafriend:

eurofox:

benicetoafriend:

IRA - Irish Republican Army
normally when i see europeans with guns i get worried that they’re probably fascist. when they’re irish though, i know its gonna be alright.

They murdered a lot of innocent people though. Even people they claimed to represent.

the same slurs used against every revolutionary/national liberation movement from the bolsheviks to every organization in palestine who has taken up armed struggle. 
how about instead of blaming the IRA for the deaths of innocent irish, maybe you place the blame on the soldiers marching under the union jack.

Because they caused the deaths of innocent people, as did the Britsh. But it was the IRA who took my mums cousin out and shot him in front of his co-workers when he was only 18 because he said he wanted nothing to do with them once he realised what sort of people they were. He was an Irish catholic. They also harassed a lad in my mums youth group, making threats towards his family until he couldn’t take it and killed himself. He was an Irish catholic too.
There was plenty of scumbags on both sides. It’s not a slur when it’s true.

^ 

ethnic nationalists are repulsive.

right, says the white settler on indigenous land. weigh in later when you’ve been enslaved and humiliated for 800+ years.

L OH FUCKING L
There is nothing more hilarious than tumblr ~*rAdIcAlS*~ speaking over lived experiences of violence to promote solidarity. 
Irish people criticising the IRA?'No, shut up you dont understand the conflict you're living through.'
Feck off. 

I don’t really have any direct lived experience of the Troubles, as growing up in south county Dublin is probably as far away from it as you could get in Ireland. But there’s one thing that always sticks in my mind as a ’90s kid’ was that, alongside the gnomes in the attic, what I was afraid of in the night on hearing a van pull up outside was that it was the IRA coming to kidnap my family (it was actually the milkman in the early morning, I think). We were Protestant, but apart from that there was no absolutely no logic behind the fear, which wasn’t all that great, considering - I didn’t lose much sleep over it, in comparison to other things, and I can only imagine what real childhood trauma from conflict must be like. Still, it’s unsettling that it was such a part of the surrounding culture that I picked up at such a young age. You could say that it was due to media demonisation, or you could say it was unavoidable. In any case, I’m of a generation who saw the last atrocities of the Troubles on the nightly news as children.
The recent death of Albert Reynolds is the passing of, I think, the first Taoiseach I can recall. And I remember the 1998 Good Friday Agreement much better than anything about the Downing Street Declaration, but I was aware of IRA ceasefires and the frustratingly slow progress of the peace process. There was a very moving scene recorded on TV at Reynold’s funeral yesterday where the celebrant addressed his British counterpart, John Major, in the church, telling him he was ‘most welcome’, followed by a spontaneous ripple of applause, and then a shot of Major wiping away a tear. Whatever you may think of either of their day-to-day politics, or of the current outcome of the peace process and its interminable but non-violent political wrangling, they achieved something of immeasurable importance. You can debate the history and the role of violence as much as you want, but the vast majority of people here are just glad it’s over. 
A more political viewpoint I, and I know many others, share is a strong opposition to the nationalist repulican ideology that justified so much violence and suffering, irrespective of the wrongs (of which there were many and greater) on the other side. I don’t know, were I there, if I would always have been opposed to physical-force republicanism, or what year would be the dividing line between radically naive and irresponsibly futile - it’s a counterfactual I don’t have to answer. But I do know an awareness of as many sides as possible of the history is important - because it is the lens through which every Irish person ought to see world affairs. Our support for the Palestinian cause is usually attributed to the Irish struggle for national liberation - although for me what I also see is an uncomfortable ambivalence towards anti-Semitism in Irish history, and more importantly a parallel between the partition of this island and the need for some kind of reconciliation or mutual understanding between divided communities. Ferguson, too, has circular echoes of the civil rights movement in late 60s Northern Ireland, inspired by its African-American counterpart, but which, for various complex reasons, derailed into thirty years of violence. It’s the legacy of the North, in large part, which makes me so uncomfortable about constant demands to ‘take a side’, to buy into the oppressed/oppressor binary which, even if it expresses some deep and uncomfortable truths about our world, does not necessarily present the solution.

Nuance- it’s what to do!

hardcorefornerds:

thewoodquarter:

benicetoafriend:

drinkingfromtherubicon:

cristoecafe:

eurofox:

benicetoafriend:

eurofox:

benicetoafriend:

IRA - Irish Republican Army
normally when i see europeans with guns i get worried that they’re probably fascist. when they’re irish though, i know its gonna be alright.

They murdered a lot of innocent people though. Even people they claimed to represent.

the same slurs used against every revolutionary/national liberation movement from the bolsheviks to every organization in palestine who has taken up armed struggle. 
how about instead of blaming the IRA for the deaths of innocent irish, maybe you place the blame on the soldiers marching under the union jack.

Because they caused the deaths of innocent people, as did the Britsh. But it was the IRA who took my mums cousin out and shot him in front of his co-workers when he was only 18 because he said he wanted nothing to do with them once he realised what sort of people they were. He was an Irish catholic. They also harassed a lad in my mums youth group, making threats towards his family until he couldn’t take it and killed himself. He was an Irish catholic too.
There was plenty of scumbags on both sides. It’s not a slur when it’s true.

^ 

ethnic nationalists are repulsive.

right, says the white settler on indigenous land. weigh in later when you’ve been enslaved and humiliated for 800+ years.

L OH FUCKING L
There is nothing more hilarious than tumblr ~*rAdIcAlS*~ speaking over lived experiences of violence to promote solidarity. 
Irish people criticising the IRA?'No, shut up you dont understand the conflict you're living through.'
Feck off. 

I don’t really have any direct lived experience of the Troubles, as growing up in south county Dublin is probably as far away from it as you could get in Ireland. But there’s one thing that always sticks in my mind as a ’90s kid’ was that, alongside the gnomes in the attic, what I was afraid of in the night on hearing a van pull up outside was that it was the IRA coming to kidnap my family (it was actually the milkman in the early morning, I think). We were Protestant, but apart from that there was no absolutely no logic behind the fear, which wasn’t all that great, considering - I didn’t lose much sleep over it, in comparison to other things, and I can only imagine what real childhood trauma from conflict must be like. Still, it’s unsettling that it was such a part of the surrounding culture that I picked up at such a young age. You could say that it was due to media demonisation, or you could say it was unavoidable. In any case, I’m of a generation who saw the last atrocities of the Troubles on the nightly news as children.
The recent death of Albert Reynolds is the passing of, I think, the first Taoiseach I can recall. And I remember the 1998 Good Friday Agreement much better than anything about the Downing Street Declaration, but I was aware of IRA ceasefires and the frustratingly slow progress of the peace process. There was a very moving scene recorded on TV at Reynold’s funeral yesterday where the celebrant addressed his British counterpart, John Major, in the church, telling him he was ‘most welcome’, followed by a spontaneous ripple of applause, and then a shot of Major wiping away a tear. Whatever you may think of either of their day-to-day politics, or of the current outcome of the peace process and its interminable but non-violent political wrangling, they achieved something of immeasurable importance. You can debate the history and the role of violence as much as you want, but the vast majority of people here are just glad it’s over. 
A more political viewpoint I, and I know many others, share is a strong opposition to the nationalist repulican ideology that justified so much violence and suffering, irrespective of the wrongs (of which there were many and greater) on the other side. I don’t know, were I there, if I would always have been opposed to physical-force republicanism, or what year would be the dividing line between radically naive and irresponsibly futile - it’s a counterfactual I don’t have to answer. But I do know an awareness of as many sides as possible of the history is important - because it is the lens through which every Irish person ought to see world affairs. Our support for the Palestinian cause is usually attributed to the Irish struggle for national liberation - although for me what I also see is an uncomfortable ambivalence towards anti-Semitism in Irish history, and more importantly a parallel between the partition of this island and the need for some kind of reconciliation or mutual understanding between divided communities. Ferguson, too, has circular echoes of the civil rights movement in late 60s Northern Ireland, inspired by its African-American counterpart, but which, for various complex reasons, derailed into thirty years of violence. It’s the legacy of the North, in large part, which makes me so uncomfortable about constant demands to ‘take a side’, to buy into the oppressed/oppressor binary which, even if it expresses some deep and uncomfortable truths about our world, does not necessarily present the solution.

Nuance- it’s what to do!

hardcorefornerds:

thewoodquarter:

benicetoafriend:

drinkingfromtherubicon:

cristoecafe:

eurofox:

benicetoafriend:

eurofox:

benicetoafriend:

IRA - Irish Republican Army
normally when i see europeans with guns i get worried that they’re probably fascist. when they’re irish though, i know its gonna be alright.

They murdered a lot of innocent people though. Even people they claimed to represent.

the same slurs used against every revolutionary/national liberation movement from the bolsheviks to every organization in palestine who has taken up armed struggle. 
how about instead of blaming the IRA for the deaths of innocent irish, maybe you place the blame on the soldiers marching under the union jack.

Because they caused the deaths of innocent people, as did the Britsh. But it was the IRA who took my mums cousin out and shot him in front of his co-workers when he was only 18 because he said he wanted nothing to do with them once he realised what sort of people they were. He was an Irish catholic. They also harassed a lad in my mums youth group, making threats towards his family until he couldn’t take it and killed himself. He was an Irish catholic too.
There was plenty of scumbags on both sides. It’s not a slur when it’s true.

^ 

ethnic nationalists are repulsive.

right, says the white settler on indigenous land. weigh in later when you’ve been enslaved and humiliated for 800+ years.

L OH FUCKING L
There is nothing more hilarious than tumblr ~*rAdIcAlS*~ speaking over lived experiences of violence to promote solidarity. 
Irish people criticising the IRA?'No, shut up you dont understand the conflict you're living through.'
Feck off. 

I don’t really have any direct lived experience of the Troubles, as growing up in south county Dublin is probably as far away from it as you could get in Ireland. But there’s one thing that always sticks in my mind as a ’90s kid’ was that, alongside the gnomes in the attic, what I was afraid of in the night on hearing a van pull up outside was that it was the IRA coming to kidnap my family (it was actually the milkman in the early morning, I think). We were Protestant, but apart from that there was no absolutely no logic behind the fear, which wasn’t all that great, considering - I didn’t lose much sleep over it, in comparison to other things, and I can only imagine what real childhood trauma from conflict must be like. Still, it’s unsettling that it was such a part of the surrounding culture that I picked up at such a young age. You could say that it was due to media demonisation, or you could say it was unavoidable. In any case, I’m of a generation who saw the last atrocities of the Troubles on the nightly news as children.
The recent death of Albert Reynolds is the passing of, I think, the first Taoiseach I can recall. And I remember the 1998 Good Friday Agreement much better than anything about the Downing Street Declaration, but I was aware of IRA ceasefires and the frustratingly slow progress of the peace process. There was a very moving scene recorded on TV at Reynold’s funeral yesterday where the celebrant addressed his British counterpart, John Major, in the church, telling him he was ‘most welcome’, followed by a spontaneous ripple of applause, and then a shot of Major wiping away a tear. Whatever you may think of either of their day-to-day politics, or of the current outcome of the peace process and its interminable but non-violent political wrangling, they achieved something of immeasurable importance. You can debate the history and the role of violence as much as you want, but the vast majority of people here are just glad it’s over. 
A more political viewpoint I, and I know many others, share is a strong opposition to the nationalist repulican ideology that justified so much violence and suffering, irrespective of the wrongs (of which there were many and greater) on the other side. I don’t know, were I there, if I would always have been opposed to physical-force republicanism, or what year would be the dividing line between radically naive and irresponsibly futile - it’s a counterfactual I don’t have to answer. But I do know an awareness of as many sides as possible of the history is important - because it is the lens through which every Irish person ought to see world affairs. Our support for the Palestinian cause is usually attributed to the Irish struggle for national liberation - although for me what I also see is an uncomfortable ambivalence towards anti-Semitism in Irish history, and more importantly a parallel between the partition of this island and the need for some kind of reconciliation or mutual understanding between divided communities. Ferguson, too, has circular echoes of the civil rights movement in late 60s Northern Ireland, inspired by its African-American counterpart, but which, for various complex reasons, derailed into thirty years of violence. It’s the legacy of the North, in large part, which makes me so uncomfortable about constant demands to ‘take a side’, to buy into the oppressed/oppressor binary which, even if it expresses some deep and uncomfortable truths about our world, does not necessarily present the solution.

Nuance- it’s what to do!

hardcorefornerds:

thewoodquarter:

benicetoafriend:

drinkingfromtherubicon:

cristoecafe:

eurofox:

benicetoafriend:

eurofox:

benicetoafriend:

IRA - Irish Republican Army
normally when i see europeans with guns i get worried that they’re probably fascist. when they’re irish though, i know its gonna be alright.

They murdered a lot of innocent people though. Even people they claimed to represent.

the same slurs used against every revolutionary/national liberation movement from the bolsheviks to every organization in palestine who has taken up armed struggle. 
how about instead of blaming the IRA for the deaths of innocent irish, maybe you place the blame on the soldiers marching under the union jack.

Because they caused the deaths of innocent people, as did the Britsh. But it was the IRA who took my mums cousin out and shot him in front of his co-workers when he was only 18 because he said he wanted nothing to do with them once he realised what sort of people they were. He was an Irish catholic. They also harassed a lad in my mums youth group, making threats towards his family until he couldn’t take it and killed himself. He was an Irish catholic too.
There was plenty of scumbags on both sides. It’s not a slur when it’s true.

^ 

ethnic nationalists are repulsive.

right, says the white settler on indigenous land. weigh in later when you’ve been enslaved and humiliated for 800+ years.

L OH FUCKING L
There is nothing more hilarious than tumblr ~*rAdIcAlS*~ speaking over lived experiences of violence to promote solidarity. 
Irish people criticising the IRA?'No, shut up you dont understand the conflict you're living through.'
Feck off. 

I don’t really have any direct lived experience of the Troubles, as growing up in south county Dublin is probably as far away from it as you could get in Ireland. But there’s one thing that always sticks in my mind as a ’90s kid’ was that, alongside the gnomes in the attic, what I was afraid of in the night on hearing a van pull up outside was that it was the IRA coming to kidnap my family (it was actually the milkman in the early morning, I think). We were Protestant, but apart from that there was no absolutely no logic behind the fear, which wasn’t all that great, considering - I didn’t lose much sleep over it, in comparison to other things, and I can only imagine what real childhood trauma from conflict must be like. Still, it’s unsettling that it was such a part of the surrounding culture that I picked up at such a young age. You could say that it was due to media demonisation, or you could say it was unavoidable. In any case, I’m of a generation who saw the last atrocities of the Troubles on the nightly news as children.
The recent death of Albert Reynolds is the passing of, I think, the first Taoiseach I can recall. And I remember the 1998 Good Friday Agreement much better than anything about the Downing Street Declaration, but I was aware of IRA ceasefires and the frustratingly slow progress of the peace process. There was a very moving scene recorded on TV at Reynold’s funeral yesterday where the celebrant addressed his British counterpart, John Major, in the church, telling him he was ‘most welcome’, followed by a spontaneous ripple of applause, and then a shot of Major wiping away a tear. Whatever you may think of either of their day-to-day politics, or of the current outcome of the peace process and its interminable but non-violent political wrangling, they achieved something of immeasurable importance. You can debate the history and the role of violence as much as you want, but the vast majority of people here are just glad it’s over. 
A more political viewpoint I, and I know many others, share is a strong opposition to the nationalist repulican ideology that justified so much violence and suffering, irrespective of the wrongs (of which there were many and greater) on the other side. I don’t know, were I there, if I would always have been opposed to physical-force republicanism, or what year would be the dividing line between radically naive and irresponsibly futile - it’s a counterfactual I don’t have to answer. But I do know an awareness of as many sides as possible of the history is important - because it is the lens through which every Irish person ought to see world affairs. Our support for the Palestinian cause is usually attributed to the Irish struggle for national liberation - although for me what I also see is an uncomfortable ambivalence towards anti-Semitism in Irish history, and more importantly a parallel between the partition of this island and the need for some kind of reconciliation or mutual understanding between divided communities. Ferguson, too, has circular echoes of the civil rights movement in late 60s Northern Ireland, inspired by its African-American counterpart, but which, for various complex reasons, derailed into thirty years of violence. It’s the legacy of the North, in large part, which makes me so uncomfortable about constant demands to ‘take a side’, to buy into the oppressed/oppressor binary which, even if it expresses some deep and uncomfortable truths about our world, does not necessarily present the solution.

Nuance- it’s what to do!

hardcorefornerds:

thewoodquarter:

benicetoafriend:

drinkingfromtherubicon:

cristoecafe:

eurofox:

benicetoafriend:

eurofox:

benicetoafriend:

IRA - Irish Republican Army
normally when i see europeans with guns i get worried that they’re probably fascist. when they’re irish though, i know its gonna be alright.

They murdered a lot of innocent people though. Even people they claimed to represent.

the same slurs used against every revolutionary/national liberation movement from the bolsheviks to every organization in palestine who has taken up armed struggle. 
how about instead of blaming the IRA for the deaths of innocent irish, maybe you place the blame on the soldiers marching under the union jack.

Because they caused the deaths of innocent people, as did the Britsh. But it was the IRA who took my mums cousin out and shot him in front of his co-workers when he was only 18 because he said he wanted nothing to do with them once he realised what sort of people they were. He was an Irish catholic. They also harassed a lad in my mums youth group, making threats towards his family until he couldn’t take it and killed himself. He was an Irish catholic too.
There was plenty of scumbags on both sides. It’s not a slur when it’s true.

^ 

ethnic nationalists are repulsive.

right, says the white settler on indigenous land. weigh in later when you’ve been enslaved and humiliated for 800+ years.

L OH FUCKING L
There is nothing more hilarious than tumblr ~*rAdIcAlS*~ speaking over lived experiences of violence to promote solidarity. 
Irish people criticising the IRA?'No, shut up you dont understand the conflict you're living through.'
Feck off. 

I don’t really have any direct lived experience of the Troubles, as growing up in south county Dublin is probably as far away from it as you could get in Ireland. But there’s one thing that always sticks in my mind as a ’90s kid’ was that, alongside the gnomes in the attic, what I was afraid of in the night on hearing a van pull up outside was that it was the IRA coming to kidnap my family (it was actually the milkman in the early morning, I think). We were Protestant, but apart from that there was no absolutely no logic behind the fear, which wasn’t all that great, considering - I didn’t lose much sleep over it, in comparison to other things, and I can only imagine what real childhood trauma from conflict must be like. Still, it’s unsettling that it was such a part of the surrounding culture that I picked up at such a young age. You could say that it was due to media demonisation, or you could say it was unavoidable. In any case, I’m of a generation who saw the last atrocities of the Troubles on the nightly news as children.
The recent death of Albert Reynolds is the passing of, I think, the first Taoiseach I can recall. And I remember the 1998 Good Friday Agreement much better than anything about the Downing Street Declaration, but I was aware of IRA ceasefires and the frustratingly slow progress of the peace process. There was a very moving scene recorded on TV at Reynold’s funeral yesterday where the celebrant addressed his British counterpart, John Major, in the church, telling him he was ‘most welcome’, followed by a spontaneous ripple of applause, and then a shot of Major wiping away a tear. Whatever you may think of either of their day-to-day politics, or of the current outcome of the peace process and its interminable but non-violent political wrangling, they achieved something of immeasurable importance. You can debate the history and the role of violence as much as you want, but the vast majority of people here are just glad it’s over. 
A more political viewpoint I, and I know many others, share is a strong opposition to the nationalist repulican ideology that justified so much violence and suffering, irrespective of the wrongs (of which there were many and greater) on the other side. I don’t know, were I there, if I would always have been opposed to physical-force republicanism, or what year would be the dividing line between radically naive and irresponsibly futile - it’s a counterfactual I don’t have to answer. But I do know an awareness of as many sides as possible of the history is important - because it is the lens through which every Irish person ought to see world affairs. Our support for the Palestinian cause is usually attributed to the Irish struggle for national liberation - although for me what I also see is an uncomfortable ambivalence towards anti-Semitism in Irish history, and more importantly a parallel between the partition of this island and the need for some kind of reconciliation or mutual understanding between divided communities. Ferguson, too, has circular echoes of the civil rights movement in late 60s Northern Ireland, inspired by its African-American counterpart, but which, for various complex reasons, derailed into thirty years of violence. It’s the legacy of the North, in large part, which makes me so uncomfortable about constant demands to ‘take a side’, to buy into the oppressed/oppressor binary which, even if it expresses some deep and uncomfortable truths about our world, does not necessarily present the solution.

Nuance- it’s what to do!

hardcorefornerds:

thewoodquarter:

benicetoafriend:

drinkingfromtherubicon:

cristoecafe:

eurofox:

benicetoafriend:

eurofox:

benicetoafriend:

IRA - Irish Republican Army

normally when i see europeans with guns i get worried that they’re probably fascist. when they’re irish though, i know its gonna be alright.

They murdered a lot of innocent people though. Even people they claimed to represent.

the same slurs used against every revolutionary/national liberation movement from the bolsheviks to every organization in palestine who has taken up armed struggle. 

how about instead of blaming the IRA for the deaths of innocent irish, maybe you place the blame on the soldiers marching under the union jack.

Because they caused the deaths of innocent people, as did the Britsh. But it was the IRA who took my mums cousin out and shot him in front of his co-workers when he was only 18 because he said he wanted nothing to do with them once he realised what sort of people they were. He was an Irish catholic. They also harassed a lad in my mums youth group, making threats towards his family until he couldn’t take it and killed himself. He was an Irish catholic too.

There was plenty of scumbags on both sides. It’s not a slur when it’s true.

ethnic nationalists are repulsive.

right, says the white settler on indigenous land. weigh in later when you’ve been enslaved and humiliated for 800+ years.

L OH FUCKING L

There is nothing more hilarious than tumblr ~*rAdIcAlS*~ speaking over lived experiences of violence to promote solidarity. 

Irish people criticising the IRA?

'No, shut up you dont understand the conflict you're living through.'

Feck off. 

I don’t really have any direct lived experience of the Troubles, as growing up in south county Dublin is probably as far away from it as you could get in Ireland. But there’s one thing that always sticks in my mind as a ’90s kid’ was that, alongside the gnomes in the attic, what I was afraid of in the night on hearing a van pull up outside was that it was the IRA coming to kidnap my family (it was actually the milkman in the early morning, I think). We were Protestant, but apart from that there was no absolutely no logic behind the fear, which wasn’t all that great, considering - I didn’t lose much sleep over it, in comparison to other things, and I can only imagine what real childhood trauma from conflict must be like. Still, it’s unsettling that it was such a part of the surrounding culture that I picked up at such a young age. You could say that it was due to media demonisation, or you could say it was unavoidable. In any case, I’m of a generation who saw the last atrocities of the Troubles on the nightly news as children.

The recent death of Albert Reynolds is the passing of, I think, the first Taoiseach I can recall. And I remember the 1998 Good Friday Agreement much better than anything about the Downing Street Declaration, but I was aware of IRA ceasefires and the frustratingly slow progress of the peace process. There was a very moving scene recorded on TV at Reynold’s funeral yesterday where the celebrant addressed his British counterpart, John Major, in the church, telling him he was ‘most welcome’, followed by a spontaneous ripple of applause, and then a shot of Major wiping away a tear. Whatever you may think of either of their day-to-day politics, or of the current outcome of the peace process and its interminable but non-violent political wrangling, they achieved something of immeasurable importance. You can debate the history and the role of violence as much as you want, but the vast majority of people here are just glad it’s over. 

A more political viewpoint I, and I know many others, share is a strong opposition to the nationalist repulican ideology that justified so much violence and suffering, irrespective of the wrongs (of which there were many and greater) on the other side. I don’t know, were I there, if I would always have been opposed to physical-force republicanism, or what year would be the dividing line between radically naive and irresponsibly futile - it’s a counterfactual I don’t have to answer. But I do know an awareness of as many sides as possible of the history is important - because it is the lens through which every Irish person ought to see world affairs. Our support for the Palestinian cause is usually attributed to the Irish struggle for national liberation - although for me what I also see is an uncomfortable ambivalence towards anti-Semitism in Irish history, and more importantly a parallel between the partition of this island and the need for some kind of reconciliation or mutual understanding between divided communities. Ferguson, too, has circular echoes of the civil rights movement in late 60s Northern Ireland, inspired by its African-American counterpart, but which, for various complex reasons, derailed into thirty years of violence. It’s the legacy of the North, in large part, which makes me so uncomfortable about constant demands to ‘take a side’, to buy into the oppressed/oppressor binary which, even if it expresses some deep and uncomfortable truths about our world, does not necessarily present the solution.

Nuance- it’s what to do!

120 notes politics culture moral game

The world is full of couples who’ve lasted for whatever length of time even though one or both of them did incredibly shitty or cruel things to the other. Their coupledom doesn’t mean that being shitty or cruel or violent is okay, and it certainly doesn’t mean that abuse of any sort is okay! It means people are very complicated and that maybe we should extend Louie and Pamela — who’s dating a guy who menaced her! — the same courtesy as viewers that we extend to, say, Tony Soprano, who killed God knows how many people, tried to smother his own mom, and who in season three nearly strangled his mistress to death. We still found Tony sympathetic. Or at least fascinating. We learned to deal with him, just as we learned to deal with Medea and Macbeth in school.

But sociopolitical blogs and websites seem to have a lot of trouble doing that when it’s a comedy, even though the hero has been established as a fucked-up guy who often does really stupid, sleazy or offensive things while he’s theoretically trying to know himself. And they shouldn’t have to do that because it’s not their mission and it’s not their job.

Matt Zoller Seitz

(Source: vulture.com)

2 notes louie tv culture louis ck comedy relationships antihero privilege moral game internet